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Papers related to:  Labor Markets

Wages of Chagrin

Wages of chagrin. (2016, April 07). The Economist. Retrieved from https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2016/04/07/wages-of-chagrin

This article from The Economist discusses:

Naidu, S., Nyarko, Y., & Wang, S. Y. (2016). Monopsony Power in Migrant Labor Markets: Evidence from the United Arab Emirates. Journal of Political Economy, 124(6), 1735-1792.

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Managed Labor Migration in Afghanistan: A Brief Review of the Academic Migration Literature

Chartouni, C., & Nyarko, Y. (2018). Managed Labor Migration in Afghanistan: A Brief Review of the Academic Migration Literature. Washington, DC: World Bank. 

This paper presents key findings on the international experience with migration, focusing on the implications for a developing nation that is a country of origin. The paper identifies several areas of impacts: (1) increases in wages of individual migrants; (2) remittances; (3) impacts on skills and skill formation – those leaving acquire skills to enhance ability to migrate, and those returning often do so with acquired skills and work experience. 

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The Economic Development Benefits of Human Mobility to Source Countries

Nyarko, Y. (2013). The Economic Development Benefits of Human Mobility to Source Countries. Labor Mobility, an Enabler for Sustainable Development. Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research (ECSSR) Conference, 49-67.

Labor mobility is particularly significant in the case of the GCC; the region is host to around 15 million expatriate workers who generate US $80 billion in annual remittances each year and support and estimate 150 million dependents in their various home countries.

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Stepping-stone mobility

Jovanovic, B., & Nyarko, Y. (1997). Stepping-stone mobility. Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, 46, 289-325.

People at the top of an occupational ladder earn more partly because they have spent time on lower rungs, where they have learned something. But what precisely do they learn?

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